Free Deal Newsletter

Our periodic newsletter is a great way to hear about ways to save money. Check the box for our daily deal update and we'll also bring the latest deals to your inbox every evening.

We NEVER share your personal information


Friday
Oct312014

8 Ways You Are Running Up Your Electric Bill

Here are eight ways you're probably wasting electricity without realizing it.

1. PLUGGING, BUT NOT PLAYING

Forget about the zombies; it's much more likely that your home is filled with vampires. Energy vampires are those devices and appliances we tend to leave plugged in 24/7 whether we're using them or not. And — on or off — every item that's plugged in is sucking power vampire-style. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, vampire energy can add as much as 10% to a consumer's monthly energy bill.

Let's use your microwave as an example. How often throughout the day do you use it to prepare food? And yet, it remains plugged in, digitally displaying the time and silently sipping electricity in the process. It's a like a 30-pound clock with a motor and rotating cooking tray. Any appliance that uses energy to do virtually nothing should at least pay you a sincere compliment every time you walk by it (a feature that industrial engineers should diligently be working on, in my humble opinion).

Help drain energy vampires by unplugging electronics and appliances you seldom use. And if you're a gadget hound, read up on the Kill A Watt EZ Electricity Usage Monitor. For around $30.00, this handy little product calculates the energy consumed by keeping any electronic appliance plugged in and forecasts your related costs weekly, monthly, and yearly. Just plug it into an outlet, plug your device or appliance into it, and get a digital read-out. Once you see how the numbers add up, it'll be difficult to leave those vampires alone.

2. CRANKING UP THE OVEN

When it comes to cooking a single item, an oven is often the "nuclear option." That single-serving pizza or leftover tuna casserole could be warmed up in the microwave and then finished in the toaster oven. For little jobs, consider how to cook in stages using smaller appliances that sip electricity instead of automatically gravitating toward the power-sucking behemoths.

3. GETTING IN HOT WATER

According to EnergyStar.gov, simply heating the water accounts for 90% of the total powerit takes wash a load of laundry. That's a whole lot of wattage. For regular loads, switch to cold water for a month and see if you notice any difference in the cleanliness of your duds. Reserve warmer water settings for fighting oil-based stains. Your budget will thank you for it.

4. DISH-DRYING

Hot water helps your dishwasher do its job, but drying with heat is added energy drain that's largely unnecessary. Today, most dishwashers feature a heated drying option that you can simply choose not to use. And though heated drying does help avoid spots on dishes, you can get the same benefit by adding a rinsing agent.

5. FIGHTING THE FLOW

As obvious as it sounds, if your home features a central air-conditioning and heating system, check your vents. Vents have a way of blending into the background of our homes; many get closed inadvertently and that can result in systems that have to work extra hard to do the job. While you're at it, make sure vents, ducts, and any filters are clean and installed properly. If you find dirt or debris that's unreachable, or if you see visible signs of mold, it may be time to have your air ducts professionally cleaned.

6. LIGHTING UP FOR THE HOLIDAYS

Still using your dad's old string of holiday lights from 1975? Well, those incandescent bulbs are using just enough electricity to drain your gift-buying budget. Ditch the old and switch to new LED lights. You'll get hours of twinkling for a tiny fraction of the electric output.

7. FRIDGE-GAZING

It's a popular pastime, but standing in front of that open fridge trying decide if you have enough ingredients for a decent turkey club isn't doing your electric bill any favors. Ponder before you open the fridge or after you've quickly scanned its contents and shut the door.

And while we're on the subject, make sure you're doing all you can to help your refrigerator last for years.

8. IGNORING POWER HOURS

Though it might not cut your electricity consumption, reserving energy-intensive tasks for off-peak hours can reduce the rate you pay. Since many power companies offer discounted rates after 8:00 p.m., focus not only on how you do things, but when. Check with your local power company to determine if it offers an off-peak discount and when off-peak hours begin and end. Then, whenever possible, schedule your laundry and dishwashing tasks to fit within that period.

It's easy to think of electricity as a mysterious force coursing through power lines that magically illuminates all we do. But in reality, it's a concrete resource that we have direct control over. Luckily, we don't need to understand electricity to conserve it. So the next time you plug in, charge up, turn on, or warm up, think of ways to do each smarter.

Source: Wisebread.com

Friday
Oct312014

20 Fun Ways to Entertain the Kids for Free

If you've ever been stuck wondering what to do with your kids on the weekend, this list is for you. You don't need to spend a dime to entertain your family and bond in the process. Sometimes the best things in life really are free! (See also: 47 cheap, Fun Things to Do This Weekend)

1. VISIT YOUR LIBRARY

We frequent our local library at least every week for free storytimes. Plus, you can pick up books, DVDs, and other materials to entertain your child for free. Many libraries also arrange toys in their children's section, and it's a great place to meet other parents to set up play-dates.

2. CHECK THE COMMUNITY CALENDAR

While you're at the library, check your local paper (or click online) and any bulletin boards for any and all events going on in your area. Very often colleges, universities, and other community centers will host family events that are free and open to the public.

3. CRASH STORE EVENTS

Sometimes book stores, grocery stores, craft stores, toy stores, and other merchants will host free activities. More often than not, these events are intended to get you to come into the store and buy things. So, consider leaving your cash and cards at home and sticking to the zero dollar budget.

4. MAKE COOKIES

Spend a Saturday afternoon in and use your baking powers to mix up a big batch of sugar cookies. Take your time and cut out shapes with cookie cutters. Then frost them. Get artistic. Encourage your child to take the lead. Small activities can turn into big learning experiences.

5. PLAY GAMES

Start a weekly tradition of playing board games with your kids. I've seen games that allow kids as young as three to participate. You can also try charades with older kids, and a deck of cards is useful in a pinch.

6. CAMP AT HOME

Skip all the site fees and other camping costs and set up the family tent in your backyard. What I love about backyard camping is that you don't necessarily have to sleep outdoors to enjoy all the fun. And you can fire up the grill for a good old fashioned cookout! (See also:This Is How You Grill Pizza At Home)

7. CREATE A SENSORY BIN

The youngest children get a kick out of homemade sensory bins. Fill a shallow plastic container (choose one with a top) with rice, corn kernels, uncooked noodles, and anything else that boasts some interesting texture. It's like a cleaner version of a sandbox that you can play with indoors.

8. VISIT MUSEUMS ON FREE DAYS

Many museums are either free or donation-only. Those that do charge admission sometimes have admission-free days each month or season. Check the museum's website or call ahead for more information.

9. REUSE CARDBOARD BOXES

Take all the cardboard boxes you intend to recycle and turn them into something great. You can make race cars, boats, robots, and even entire houses! We often do our grocery shopping at Aldi and use the boxes they stock to transport our food home. Our daughter gets hours of enjoyment! (See also: What You Should Never Buy From Aldi)

10. BUILD A LIBRARY

Have you heard of Little Free Libraries? They are tiny "houses" you place books into for your neighbors to borrow. (They can leave books for you to read, too!) If this concept sounds cool to you, take a weekend to build and decorate a structure. Then identify a few old books on your shelf that you'd be willing to share. (See also: Free Books: Little Libraries That Build Community)

11. MELT CRAYONS

Take all those odds and ends of your child's crayons and turn them into neat shapes with swirled colors. You just preheat your oven to 300 degrees Fahrenheit, place crayons in a silicone mold, and bake for 15 minutes. Let cool completely before using.

12. RIDE A BIKE

Head to a local park or hit the sidewalks for a family bike ride. You can have a destination in mind, like a playground, or just wander the streets. Sometimes you'll discover more free things to do — street performers, festivals, neighborhood gatherings — on the go.

13. RAKE LEAVES

It may seem like a chore at first, but getting the whole family involved with raking leaves will get the job done faster. Or maybe not. Half the fun of completing this chore with your kids is jumping in them. Make sure you drink a warm mug of cider when you're done.

14. USE PERKS

If you have store or restaurant loyalty cards, take a weekend and use as many free meals, ice creams, pizzas, doughnuts, and whatever else you've earned. I like to store my coupons and cards in a plastic zip pocket inside a three-ring binder. That way, I don't lose anything and can quickly check there before heading out the door.

15. GO GEOCACHING

Take your family on a real life treasure hunt using your GPS device. You'll navigate to specific coordinates and look for clues to get you to your next destination. Little explorers are sure to love this activity.

16. CREATE A HOME THEATER

Save yourself the high ticket and concessions costs and watch a movie at home. Make it legit! Have the whole family wear their pajamas, pop some popcorn in your microwave, and turn out all the lights. You can even make it a double feature for the same $0.00 price tag.

17. WALK IN NATURE

Grab a bag or container and head into your backyard or local hiking trail. Have your child collect small plants, leaves, nuts, flowers, and any other natural treasures. Then bring them home and identify them. Your little scientist might also like to make his or her own terrarium and add to the collections as weeks go on.

18. PARTY AT THE BEACH

Well, now that the weather is getting colder, you won't go to the actual beach. Instead, have an indoor beach party. Turn the thermostat up a degree, fill up the tub with water and some floatation devices, and have you kid put on his or her swimsuit. You can lay out on the living room floor, pack and indoor picnic, and slip into your sandals.

19. CRAFT

You don't need an expensive subscription service to do crafts with your kids. Gather up all your crayons, markers, glues, glitters, stickers, pipe cleaners, and other supplies and create DIY Craft Kits. Whatever you group together doesn't have to make anything specific. The magic is in the creativity.

20. HOST A SLEEPOVER

Invite a couple of your child's friends over for a sleepover using some of the activities above. You can make homemade pizza versus getting takeout. Play hide-and-seek with flashlights. Build forts. Play board games. If you kid is a little too young for a whole night, make it an afternoon!

Source: Wisebread.com

Friday
Oct312014

10 Types of Bargains You Should Skip

 

1. GOING-OUT-OF-BUSINESS SALES

Take care these aren't run by a liquidation firm that is trying to get as much money as possible for the products. You'll find products marked down that are actually marked up from the original selling price, but are now being compared to a Suggested Retail Price.

Investigators at ABC news found on "product after product we could peel back the surface price tags to reveal the old prices below. For example, the surface price tag on a Calphalon saucepan said $124.99. But the one underneath said $109.99. Rachael Ray cookware? $199 on the new label, $179 on the old. The tag on a curtain scarf said $39.99 on the top, but peel it back carefully and there was another price tag for $27.99 below."

In some cities, stores have been "going out of business" for years. Even when Blockbuster went out of business, the prices they were charging for used DVDs were comparable to the prices of new DVDs online.

2. REALLY CHEAP FOOTWEAR

They may look decent enough, but your feet deserve good support, and any shoe or sneaker under $20 is going to have some major quality issues. A lot of these shoes are made in very undesirable places by impoverished laborers, and the emphasis is always about making the cheapest product possible. Not only will they give you back problems and cause blisters and other foot maladies, they'll also disintegrate within a few months of wear.

Unless it's a genuine quality shoe that was marked down by 80%-90%, you should avoid cheap footwear at all costs.

3. ZERO-INTEREST FINANCING

There's a caveat to this one. If you are someone who is meticulous about paying bills, and know with absolute certainty that you'll never miss a payment, you should consider it. Otherwise, don't bother. Free credit comes with a ball and chain of legal documentation that is designed to jump on you should you miss a single payment, or not pay off the loan in full within a certain time frame. The interest is calculated throughout the life of the loan, often at an exorbitant rate (think 25% and greater) and it's all added on if you make one mistake. Zero-interest financing can be great for a select few, but for others, it can be a nightmare.

4. DOORBUSTERS

Black Friday is coming, and you'll see adverts and flyers advertising insane "doorbusters" deals. Just be careful with these, and do your research. Doorbusters items are often old models that the store wants to dump, or are not even bargains at all. The Wall Street Journal found that many of these doorbusters were available at lower prices at other times that year, and pricing research firm Decide Inc. found that "nearly one-third of the products had been sold at lower prices this year." It may say doorbuster, but it doesn't mean it's a deal.

5. MANY BOGO OFFERS

BOGO used to mean Buy One, Get One free. Now it means anything from Buy One, Get One 50% off, to Buy Ten, Get One free (which is technically BTGO). The BOGO offers can be great money savers, if you want two or more of anything you're setting out to buy. But they are often designed to coax you into buying more of a product than you really want; and often, more of a product that the store is trying to get rid of. Just remember to average out the cost of the product, and if you can use all of it (especially if it's a perishable).

6. FLOOR MODELS

Stores like Best Buy will often let you buy floor models at reduced prices, but beware. First, you have no idea how long the floor model was actually on display. This is not a big deal for a dishwasher or fridge because they aren't in use. But for HDTVs, Blu-ray players, laptops, and other electronics, it's significant. You can ask an employee, but usually they don't know. Being on for 18 hours a day is wearing out the life of the product, and you don't want to take that risk. You also have to consider factory warranties, any missing accessories, and return policies. Then, look at the price of a new product (it may be on sale), or one that is "open box." The latter is a much better deal as it will be a reduced price for something that's simply missing its packaging. Floor models are often too big of a risk, despite the hefty discount.

7. EXTENDED WARRANTIES

Also called service plans, these are sold to you as a bargain. "It's just an extra $50 to cover your product for three years," says the store clerk as you're checking out with a $200 printer. Well, it's $50 you don't need to spend, and it adds a significant cost to the item you're buying. Consumer Reports says, "Our data show that products usually don't break during the two-to-three-year period after the manufacturer's warranty expires and the service plan is in effect." To put it bluntly, you're paying for something that won't be needed until it's expired. Don't bother. It will be money down the drain.

8. INTEREST CHECKING ACCOUNTS

Banks want you to skip the free checking and earn interest on your money. But it is often just a way to get you paying a monthly fee for a return that's almost insignificant. You will often need to keep a minimum balance in that account to earn a paltry rate of return, and when you look at the statements every month you'll see your banking fees are greater than what you're getting back. Unless you've got a ton of money in a regular free checking account (which is unlikely), you should stick to traditional free checking.

9. RENTAL CAR INSURANCE

It may sound cheap enough at the counter when you're signing the paperwork; especially when you compare it to the hundreds, or even thousands, of dollars you may have to spend should someone even ding the car while it's in your possession. But the truth is, most people don't need it. Your current car insurance policy will usually extend to a rental car. If you pay with a credit card, it will almost certainly offer rental car coverage in the transaction. The sales clerk will scare you with bug numbers and what-if scenarios, but seriously, skip the "bargain" that's "just a few extra bucks for a lot of protection."

10. OVERDRAFT PROTECTION

Federal law now states that you have to opt in to overdraft protection (it used to be an opt out clause) but you really need to stay away from it.

The pros of overdraft protection are weak to say the least. Sure, you won't have your card declined at the register, or be humiliated in a restaurant. But to be honest, you really should have a better handle on your money to avoid that ever happening anyway.

The cons? They're huge. A simple $4 cup of coffee can cost you $35 in overdraft protection fees. In fact, a study by Moebs found that "the average customer who took out a $100 loan from a payday lender paid about $17.97 in interest and fees, compared to the $27 average for overdraft fees." When something is looking bad next to a payday loan, you know it's awful! See if you can link your checking to your savings account. It's your money you're using, not the bank's.

 

Source: Wisebread.com

Monday
Oct272014

Baby Wipe Recall

Effective October 25th, there has been a nationwide voluntary product recall on select baby wipes distributed by the company Nutek Disposables as some packages may contain bacteria.

This recall affects wipes that were manufactured under the brand names including CutiesDiapers.com,FemtexFred’sKidgetsMember’s MarkSimply RightSunny SmilesTender Touch, and Well Beginnings. These wipes were distributed by Nutek prior to October 21st, 2014 to the following retail stores: Walgreens, Sam’s Club, Family Dollar, Fred’s, and Diapers.com. For more information, go here.

Saturday
Oct252014

Free Photo Reusable Bag- $16.99 Value

Right now, new customers can get a FREE Reusable Shopping Bag! These have a value of $16.99 so this is a great freebie. You will have to pay shipping of around $7.99! 

Get your deal here. Ends Nov.1, 2014.

Friday
Oct102014

Truvia Class Action Law Suit

Did you purchase at least one Truvia Natural Sweetener product in the United States between July 1, 2008 and July 24, 2014? If so, you qualify for up to a $45 check or $90 worth of FREE Truvia Natural Sweetener Products via the Truvia Natural Sweetener Settlement.

To submit your claim, head here and complete the form no later than December 5, 2014. You can also request that a copy of the claim form be mailed to you by calling 1-888-512-0492 or request the form by e-mail at mail@TruviaSweetenerLawsuit.com. You may choose to receive either a cash refund or a voucher for free products. Click here for more information.

** No proof of purchase is necessary to obtain settlement benefits. However, the Claim Form must be signed by you under penalty of perjury (either by hand or, if you submit it online, electronically), affirming that you are a qualified member of the Settlement Class and that the information provided therein is true and accurate to the best of your knowledge. **

Source: Hip2Save

Friday
Oct102014

AT&T Customer Refund

If you are a current or past AT&T Mobile customer (AT&T customers after January 1, 2009 are eligible) and you believe that you may have been charged by AT&T for unauthorized third-party charges (like subscriptions for ringtones and text message subscriptions for horoscopes, celebrity gossip, and flirting tips), then you may be entitled to a refund.

To submit your claim, head here and complete the form no later than May 1, 2015. To request a refund, you will need either the AT&T billing account number or mobile phone number for the affected account. If you are unsure if you are eligible for a refund, contact the FTC’s refund contractor at 1-877-819-9692 for more information.

Source:Hip2Save

Wednesday
Sep172014

73 Easy Ways to Save Money

The first step to saving dough is to have a go-to list of cost-cutting strategies in your pocket. Below are 73 ways to cut spending, some more orthodox than others. Find just a few that work for you and watch the savings add up. (See also:The 10 Things Everyone Should Be Saving For)

1. CANCEL CABLE TV

With so many streaming options like Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon Prime, there's barely any reason to pay for cable TV. at all. Unless you watch a whole lot of new programming, it's even cheaper to buy your shows by the season through itunes.

2. FIND A CHEAPER CELL PLAN

Don't overpay for minutes or data that you're not using. Likewise, be sure to shop carriers every time your contract is up to make sure you're buying from the cheapest service provider (assuming they also offer the best coverage, of course).

3. SHOP FOR GROCERIES WITH A LIST

A list can help keep you from adding needless items in the shopping cart (chocolate chip cookies, anyone?) that can flatten your wallet while fattening your waistline.

4. SHOP YOUR HOME AND AUTO INSURANCE POLICIES

There are no discounts for loyalty these days. One expert I spoke with recently estimated a$600 – $800 annual savings by comparing insurance carriers every couple of years. That's a big bang for a couple of minutes worth of work.

5. BUY DISCOUNT PHARMACEUTICALS

Large retailers are increasingly offering discounted pharmaceuticals. GoodRX.com compares prescription prices to help you find the lowest costs in your area. Both Target and Walmart have a large list of generics that are priced at $4 for a month's supply. Shop Rite also offers a discount generics program as well as free short-term supplies of prenatal vitamins and diabetes medication.

6. THROW A POTLUCK PARTY (INSTEAD OF GOING OUT)

Going out to eat is expensive. Why not have your friends over, instead? If everyone brings a dish or drink, you can all eat like royalty for the night — for next to nothing.

7. LEARN TO SEW

Taking your duds to the tailor for button and rip repairs can add up, not to mention the price of scrapping the item altogether and buying new. Why not learn to sew and make minor repairs on your own at the fraction of the price?

8. ASK YOUR CREDIT CARD COMPANY FOR A RATE REDUCTION

If you carry a credit card balance, any reduction in rate can help shave a couple of dollars off your costs. Before you call, be prepared with any offers you've received from competitors and come to the phone with a script, like this one. If you have a $5,000 balance, a 5% rate reduction could save you $250 over the course of a year.

9. CONSIGN CLOTHES YOU DON'T WEAR ANYMORE

Clearing clutter not only saves space and time, but it can also pad your savings account, if you send your castoffs to your local consignment shop. Most consignors offer you a percentage of what the items sells for, keeping the remainder for themselves to pay for overhead and as profit. If you're not wearing the duds anymore, it can pay (literally) to clean house.

10. LEARN TO COOK

A recent study found that it costs $12.28 per person to dine out, on average. If you live in a major city or have champagne tastes (like me), it can cost substantially more. Cut your dining costs by at least half by cooking more of your meals at home.

11. COOK MEALS IN BATCHES

Save time and money by doubling or tripling recipes when you cook. It takes just as much effort to cook one meal but you'll end up with two or three nights worth of dinners (saving you time as well!) plus you can save cash by buying groceries in bulk. (See also: Save Time and Money With a Bulk Cooking Weekend)

12. OPEN YOUR WINDOWS

Cooling costs add up in the summer. Instead of turning on the air conditioner, open up the windows. You'll save money and air out the house at the same time.

13. TURN OFF THE LIGHTS

Don't let your electric bills get out of control. Listen to what dad always said and turn off lights when you leave a room.

14. UNPLUG UNUSED APPLIANCES AND GADGETS

Even if they're not in use, they're still draining electricity, so long as the plug is in the socket.

15. BORROW BOOKS, EBOOKS, AND AUDIOBOOKS FROM YOUR LOCAL LIBRARY

Voracious readers know that book costs can add up quickly. Save yourself some dough and borrow from your local library instead. Most libraries have added e- and audio books to their catalogs, so you can borrow in your favorite format.

16. DECLUTTER

Decluttering your home helps you find the things you already own — so you're less likely to make the mistake of buying items in duplicate or triplicate (of which I am guilty!). Bonus: You'll also save time because you'll know where everything is. (See also: Do This One Thing a Day to Defeat Clutter Forever)

17. USE LED LIGHTBULBS

A household can save over $6,000 by switching their home lighting from incandescent bulbs to LEDs. The bulbs cost substantially more up front, but they're extremely energy efficient. They can last between 11 and 17 years, even if used up to 12 hours a day. Over time, the higher up-front cost of the bulbs will pay you back in substantially lower energy and replacement costs.

18. CANCEL UNUSED SUBSCRIPTIONS

Unread magazine subscriptions needlessly clutter your space and drain your wallet. If you're not reading the issues, let the subscription go.

19. CANCEL UNUSED MEMBERSHIPS

It's easy to let memberships services like those to Netflix and your local gym run, even if you're not using them. Check out where you're being billed monthly for a service you don't utilize and get canceling.

20. BUY USED

Consignment stores are good for more than just selling. You can often buy high end brands at a fraction of the price at your local consignment shop, eBay, or from sporting goods resale shops. Great finds can also be found at yard sales and estate sales.

21. SET UP A BABYSITTING CO-OP WITH FRIENDS

Long gone are the days when a local teen would watch your kids for $3 an hour. Today's babysitters charge anywhere between $10 and $20 per hour, depending on where in the country you live and how many kids you have. Instead of breaking the bank to get some much needed quality time with your partner, set up a babysitting co-op with other local parents.

22. BROWN BAG YOUR LUNCH

One online calculator estimates a New Yorker can save $31,200 over 10 years by packing a lunch instead of going out. Even workers in less pricy cities can see substantial savings from a homemade lunch. (See also: 25 Quick, Cheap Lunch Ideas)

23. PERFORM ROUTINE MAINTENANCE ON YOUR CAR

Your car's regular service isn't the place to scrimp. Changing your car's oil and filter every 3,000 – 10,000 miles (depending on what your owner's manual recommends) is the best way to avoid engine failure, which can add up to thousands of dollars in repair or replacement costs. That's just for starters. To avoid costly repairs, follow your auto manual's recommendations for air filter changes, tire rotations, brake checks and more.

24. WEAR MORE TRADITIONALLY STYLED CLOTHES

Following fashion trends can be expensive, particularly for women. Traditional or conservative style choices go out of fashion less often, meaning you can update your wardrobe less frequently.

25. PLANT A VEGETABLE GARDEN

According to one blogger, the Burpee Seed Co. estimates a $1250 produce yield for every $50 a family spends on seeds and fertilizer.

26. CHECK OUT FREE OR CHEAP COMMUNITY EVENTS

Most communities offer free or inexpensive community events like these, found in New York City. Check out your local chamber of commerce or township website for what's available near you. Most often you can stay entertained without spending a dime.

27. DITCH YOUR CAR

According to AAA, the average annual cost of owning a car is $8,876 per year. If you live in a walkable area or in a city with a good transportation system, you could easily forego that cost.

28. PACK YOUR OWN VACATION SNACKS

Most major theme parks will let you carry your own snacks through the gate and the savings can really add up. A snack-sized serving of grapes costs $3.69 in Walt Disney World's Magic Kingdom while you can buy an entire bag at the grocery store for about the same amount. Pack a backpack on your next day trip and you can shave beaucoup bucks off your final day's tab.

29. PACK SNACKS AND COFFEE FOR YOUR CAR TRIP

We all want to break up a long drive with a stop at Starbucks. In my area, a tall frappuccino costs over $4. Add in another for my spouse and some snacks for the kids and a little diversion can add up to over $20. Instead, bring some brew from home and pack kiddie snacks in a couple of ziplock bags.

30. NEGOTIATE FEES WITH SERVICE PROVIDERS

Everything is negotiable, so… negotiate!

31. USE COUPONS

If you don't like the coupon clutter, check one of the latest coupon apps like RetailMeNot orFavado.

32. VACATION WITHIN DRIVING DISTANCE

Airfare rose 2% in 2013 and flyers coughed up $3.4 billion in fees last year. Bring down the cost of your vacation by going Griswold style and packing up the station wagon (or minivan).

33. EXERCISE AT HOME

According to one source, the average cost of a gym membership is $55 per month. Instead, check out these exercises that will give you a gym-quality workout for free.

34. PAY OFF YOUR DEBTS

The average household owes in $7,221 in credit card debt at an average fixed rate APR of 13.02%. All that interest adds up to money that's needlessly being paid out to credit card companies. Stop the cycle, pay in cash, and stash those payments in your own account. (See also: How to Wipe Out Your Credit Card Balance)

35. SAVE YOUR LOOSE CHANGE

Put it in a jar at the end of each day and watch the pennies add up.

36. QUIT SMOKING

pack of cigarettes costs $5.51, on average, and THEY KILL YOU.

37. BREW YOUR OWN COFFEE

One blogger estimates the cost of a cup of home brew at 16 cents per cup. Compare that to your local coffee shop.

38. USE FEE-FREE ATMS

Find one here.

39. PAY EXTRA TOWARD YOUR MORTGAGE

Calculate your potential annual savings here.

40. WEATHERPROOF YOUR HOME

You'll save on energy and replacement costs by insulating pipes, installing storm doors and windows, and caulking cracks.

41. BUY CLOTHING ON SALE

Retailers want to make room for new merchandise at the end of a season and usually slash prices to a fraction of what you'll find at high season. Take advantage of the savings by buying off season and preparing for the following year.

42. BUY CONSIGNED CLOTHING ONLINE

Consignment stores aren't just for selling your cast offs. Check your local options or check out some of the newer online consignors like TwiceThredUP, or Greene Street Consignment.

43. BUY HIGH QUALITY CLOTHING

Don't like to buy used? Invest in higher quality duds that will stand up to wear and tear over the years. The upfront cost may be higher but over time you'll be shopping far less often.

44. LEARN TO IRON

The average two-piece dress costs $12.47 to dry clean. Iron your pieces at home and you can stretch the time between dry cleanings.

45. SET GIFT PRICE LIMITS

The average cost of Christmas for families in 2013 was $801. Birthdays and holidays don't have to be as expensive if you talk to your loved ones and set a price limit on gift giving. It's the thought that counts, anyway. Right?

46. BUY A SMALLER HOME

Because lower utility bills, lower maintenance costs, less to clean, less to furnish, and lower tax bills. Need I say more?

47. LIVE CLOSE TO WORK

One blogger estimates you can buy a house priced $15,900 more for each mile you live closer to work.

48. MOVE TO A CHEAPER CITY

According to one online calculator, it costs half as much to live in Chapel Hill, NC as it does to live in New York City. Make your own comparisons.

49. GET A ROOMMATE

Half the rent, half the utilities.

50. PAY YOUR BILLS ON TIME

Chronic late credit card payers can face a fee of $35 per month, in some instances. That's an added expense with no included benefit. (See also: How to Get Rid of and Avoid Late Fees)

51. DOWNSIZE TO ONE CAR

Save on the added insurance and maintenance costs of the extra set of wheels.

52. DOWNSIZE TO A SMALLER CAR

A sedan has a lower sticker price and also guzzles less gas than an SUV.

53. SKIP THE CREDIT CARD WITH THE ANNUAL FEE

There are plenty of reward cards available that don't tack on an unnecessary annual fee.

54. CANCEL YOUR LANDLINE

91% of Americans carry a cell phone so there's little reason to maintain the expense of an additional land line.

55. SEND YOUR KID TO A CHEAPER COLLEGE

In his latest book David and Goliath, Malcolm Gladwell argues that the academically gifted will rise to the top at a lower-tier school and that there are many esteem-boosting advantages to this education strategy. You and your kid can also save a whole heck of a lot of money in the process.

56. KEEP DRIVING YOUR BEATER

A paid off car has one major advantage over a new car: It's paid off. Think twice before you upgrade to a newer model with a hefty monthly price tag.

57. CREATE A PERSONAL WAITING PERIOD

One study found that North Americans spend more than $4 billion per year in impulse buys. Create a cooling off period for yourself and go home to think about a purchase, before you make it. You'll be surprised by how much you'll save.

58. USE CLOTH DIAPERS

For new parents who can stomach the added responsibility, cloth diapering can save a family several thousand dollars by the time baby turns two and a half.

59. SKIP YOUR SUPERMARKET'S PRE-CUT FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

The markup is high and they expire faster. Cut your own and save.

60. BUY GENERIC GROCERIES

Generic groceries usually taste just as good as their more expensive brand-name counterparts. They're also cheaper.

61. EAT HOMEMADE SOUP

Invest in a $20 crock pot and throw all your leftovers in the pot. Dinner is made when you get home from work, it was cheap, and it's good for you. Triple win. (See also: Thursday Night Soup: Delicious Soup From Leftovers)

62. MAKE YOUR OWN BREAD

Baking bread is easier than you think. A homemade loaf also costs a small fraction of a store-bought loaf.

63. FREECYCLE YOUR CASTOFFS

Declutter your life by taking advantage of your local freecycle community. You can also find a few new things for yourself, at zero added cost.

64. MOW YOUR OWN LAWN

The cost to hire a service to mow your lawn averages between $0.06 and $0.31 per square foot. Mow your own and you can save a bundle over time.

65. GO TO THE MATINEE

From the movie house to Broadway theater, matinee showings are substantially cheaper. If you're paying for a few friends or family members, the cost can be cut dramatically by watching a show in the afternoon instead of evening.

66. MAKE FRUGAL FRIENDS

Frugal friends can help you keep your savings goals on track, inspire you with new ideas, and won't encourage you to break the bank on the newest trends.

67. HAVE YOUR SHOES REPAIRED

Repairing quality footwear is usually more cost effective than buying cheaper shoes more frequently. A quality pair of men's dress shoes can last for 10 years or more, particularly if they're resoled or re-crafted. A good cobbler can extend the life of your shoes for decades.

68. BUY CHEAPER WINE

The research shows that we really can't tell the difference between an expensive bottle of French wine and a cheaper bottle of domestic swill. Save yourself the bucks and buy cheap. If you're serving guests and want to look upscale, invest in a decanter, just for show.

69. SHOP CONSIGNMENT SALES FOR KIDS CLOTHES AND TOYS

There are consignment sales throughout the country where parents sell their castoff toys and clothes for a fraction of the cost of buying new. Find one near you and save big.

70. DRESS FOR THE WEATHER

Before you crank up the heat, grab a cardigan to stay warm. Offset the cost of high fuel costs with appropriate winter gear in the house. Sweaters, fingerless gloves, and fleece pants help keep you warm in cold weather.

71. VACATION IN THE OFF SEASON

A September beach vacation can cost half of what it costs in July or August. (See also: Top Travel Reward Credit Cards)

72. VACATION VIA A HOUSESHARE PROGRAM

Services like Airbnb give you the opportunity to find unique vacation accommodations while you save a few bucks. You can also earn some cash by renting out your own place while you're out of town.

73. DRINK AT HOME

Skip the expensive bar and have your nightcap at home with friends.

 

Source: Wisebread.com