Free Deal Newsletter

Our periodic newsletter is a great way to hear about ways to save money. Check the box for our daily deal update and we'll also bring the latest deals to your inbox every evening.

We NEVER share your personal information

Wednesday
Sep202017

5+ Ways to Make $$ at a Resale Event

 

Lately, I've been clearing out a lot of clutter before the holidays. I donate items to Goodwill but I also sell items at my local resale event in a few months.

If you have tons of baby clothes, toys and more that you no longer need, you have to keep reading! Many PTA’s around the country sponsor “resale” events, where for a fee, you can rent a table and sell your items.

Tip 1: Gather everything you want to sell

Here are some items that sell well at resale events:

-         baby and children’s clothing
-         brand new items
-         toys (new or barely used)
-         diapers
-         Little Tikes toys
-         Outdoor play equipment
-         Car seats
-         Strollers
-         Books

Items that don’t sell very well (or at all):

-         stained or torn clothing
-         toys with missing or broken parts
-         stuffed animals
-         fast food toys


Tip 2: Price competitively

You’ll want to price your items so you make a profit and still offer a great deal. Typically, here is how I price items:

  • Baby clothing: $1 each
  • Children’s clothing: $1-2 each, coats: $5 each, nice outfits $5 each
  • Brand new items: Depending on what it is, I take about 50% off what I paid
  • Toys: I charge more for new, in package toys. Used toys I charge less.
  • Diapers: $4 per bag
  • Little Tikes: Because Little Tikes is so expensive brand new, people are willing to pay a little more. So if your item was originally $150, try to get at least $50 for it.
  • Outdoor play equipment: Another popular category, price about 30-50% less than what you paid.
  • Car seats: You probably won’t get close to what you paid originally. Also, the car seat should be in perfect condition, never in an accident, etc.
  • Strollers: Depending on condition, 30-50% off what you paid.
  • Books: Typically, $1-2 per book
  • school packs. If you have extra, brand new school supplies, divide them up into Ziplocs and sell for $1 a bag.



Tip 3: Clean everything and price everything

It’s important to have great presentation when it comes to selling items. For example, I was all clothing and put into Ziploc bags, with the size and price on the outside of the bag. Toys are cleaned (baby wipes are great for this). Having great presentation at your table is essential for making sales.

Tip 4: Stuff to bring to the sale

-         tape
-         black marker
-         pens
-         change ($20-$30 in ones, $10 in quarters, some 5’s and 10’s)
-         snacks and drinks
-         a helper, to help sell and run the table, if you need to step out for a moment
-         A smile and a helpful attitude. Typically people who are coming to the sale are looking for specific items
-         Plastic bags to bag up their purchases
-         Box to keep money in

Tip 5: Have fun!

Resale events are great for not only getting rid of clutter and making money, but meeting new people! Have fun with your sale!

Thursday
Sep072017

10 Places to Treat Your Pup to FREE Treats

1.) Starbucks 

Ask the barista for a “Puppuccino” and you’ll receive a free short-sized cup of whipped cream for your pup to enjoy.

2.) Sonic Drive-In

You may get a FREE dog treat, just ask!

3.) Dunkin’ Donuts

Some drive-thrus may keep dog treats handy. 

4.) Sprinkles

Sprinkles offers Pupcakes for just $2.50 each and they’re sugar-free cupcakes topped with yogurt frosting. Some pupcakes are also topped with peanuts, sprinkles or fondant bones.

5.) Dairy Queen 

Ask your cashier for a Pup Cup the next time you’re at Dairy Queen with your dog and you may receive a free small-serving of vanilla soft serve ice cream (select locations).

6.) Shake Shack

Shake Shack offers a doggie bag Bag O’ Bones with 5 ShackBurger Dog Biscuits for around $7.50 OR a Pooch-ini treat that includes 2 dog biscuits in a peanut butter sauce with vanilla custard for under $4.

7.) In-N-Out Burger 

If you have an In-N-Out Burger restaurant nearby, you can order a “Pup Patty” for under $1 that features a plain hamburger patty without any salt added and is served in a doggy bag.

8.) Johnny Rockets

At Johnny Rockets restaurants, you can order a plain hamburger patty (fee applies) and even ask for fresh water for your pup. Plus, at select Johnny Rocket locations, you may even be able to order treats like a lickety split ice cream or pupcake. Dogs are welcome at all locations.

9.) Chick-fil-A

Many Chick-fil-A drive-thrus have a box of Milk-Bone dog treats at the window and will offer them to pup passengers. 

10.) Culver’s

Culver’s locations may offer milk bones to dogs coming through the drive thru. 

Monday
Aug282017

10 Best Lifetime Guarantees

Saturday
Aug262017

DIY Emergency Kit List

Tuesday
Aug082017

Free Betty Crocker Samples, Coupons, More

Betty Crocker’s FREE email delivers the best of Betty’s 15,000 kitchen-tested recipes, how-tos and more — straight to your inbox! PLUS, get up to $250 per year in coupons savings and access to FREE samples (quantities limited, one per member). 
Tuesday
Aug012017

Abby Loves Purina Beyond Snacks #chewyinfluencer

 

We adopted Abby a little over a year ago as a 7 month old puppy. She will be 2 on Halloween! She is such a fun, energetic little pup. At only 32 lbs. she is a ball of energy and always getting into trouble! Abby is a mix of German Shepherd and Rhodesian Ridgeback. 

She loves car rides and going to the park. She is always on the go with me.

One of her fave to go snacks is Beyond White Meat Chicken Cutlets. It has all-natural white meat chicken in every batch. For a natural, grain-free dog snack that offers both great taste and quality ingredients you can trust.


Instagram- @Beyondpetfood

 

Here is Abby romping at the park, all kinds of energy!

 

Abby says thank you to Chewy.com for sending the bag of treats. We will definitely be stocking up again on these in the future!

 

 

I received these goodies free of charge from Chewy.com in an exchange for my honest review.

Thursday
Jul202017

Food Storage Tips

Stocking up on food but not sure how long food is good for, or where to store it? Here is what you need to know! 
  
Canned Goods: 

Commercially canned foods are good for two to five years from the date they were packed.  High acid food like tomato sauce will not keep as long as a can of beans, for example. Canned protein like tuna, chicken, corned beef and even bacon have a shelf life of five years, or longer. 

Canned foods lose vitamins as time goes by so you will want to rotate your food supply so you are using and replacing items before their “use by” dates. 

And canning is another great way to stock up on your own homegrown produce or great deals from your local store. Check out our canning guide.
 

Containers like Rubbermaid or OXO are also a good bet for tightly sealing in food.
  1. Rice. White rice should be used within two years after opening, brown within six months as it has more protein. You can extend the shelf life of white rice to 10 years or longer when properly sealed and stored.
  2. Flour. You can count on all-purpose flour lasting well for three to six months in its sealed bag, up to one year in the refrigerator and longer if stored in a freezer.
  3. Sugar. Sugar is one of the few products that lasts indefinitely. The only problem it presents for cooks is that it can harden. For this reason, plan on sugar having a useful shelf life of about two years.
  4. Soft grains — Barley, oats and rye are soft grains that can last as long as eight years.
  5. Hard grains — Corn, wheat and flax are in this category. They can last between 10 and 12 years.
  6. Beans — Hermetically sealed, they can last between eight and 10 years before they need to be tossed. As they age, they lose oils and may need to be ground.
  7. Pasta — It can last as long as 10 years. As with most other foods, cooler temperatures will help it last even longer.

I also recommend investing in a vacuum sealer. Amazon has them as low as $78 and watch for sales to bring the price down even more. One of the best ways to store anything, especially dry items in bulk, is in glass canning jars that have been vacuum sealed. 

So where do you store all this stuff? 


It may require a little creativity on your part to find space for your new food reserves. Just keep in mind that most of us have space currently occupied by stuff we never use and really don’t need.
  • Under the bed. Shallow plastic containers are perfect for holding canned goods and sealed dry goods.
  • Basement. I have shelves set up, just for my stored food. I mark everything with a marker, when I bought it, etc. so I know when I need to rotate the stockpile.
  • Closets. Another place to organize your food. Just be careful cans don't fall on your head! 
  • Under stairs. Simple shelves can organize this space and make it ideal for food storage.
  • Be sure to stock up on OXO and Rubbermaid containers.
Wednesday
Jul192017

$1200 For a Penny? Make Money Collecting Pennies

Recently I got into collecting wheat pennies. The wheat penny is a classic iconic early 21st century American coin with a face value of 1 cent that was minted from 1909 to 1956. I had read that a few rare ones could be as valuable as $750+ so I decided it was worth the trouble to start looking around.

As you can see above, these are my newer pennies. I am saving the shiny, newer ones for a project, a penny top table.

The dates listed below are worth more than just a few cents, unlike most of the ones referenced above.

Values are for problem-free coins in a grade of good or better, and uncirculated for those dated 1959 and later.

  • 1909 — $3 and up
  • 1909 VDB — $10 and up
  • 1909-S — $85 and up
  • 1909-S VDB — $750 and up
  • 1910-S – $15
  • 1911-D – $5
  • 1911-S – $40
  • 1912 – $1
  • 1912-D – $6
  • 1912-S – $20
  • 1913-D – $3
  • 1913-S – $12
  • 1914-D – $175
  • 1914-S – $20
  • 1915 – $1.50
  • 1915-D – $2
  • 1915-S – $20
  • 1916-D – $1
  • 1916-S – $1.50
  • 1921-S – $1
  • 1922-D – $15
  • 1922 plain – $650
  • 1923-S – $2
  • 1924-D – $30
  • 1924-S – $1
  • 1926-S – $5
  • 1931-D – $4
  • 1931-S – $100
  • 1932 – $1.50
  • 1932-D – $1
  • 1933 – $1
  • 1933-D – $2
  • 1943-D boldly doubled mintmark – $10
  • 1944 D/S – $125
  • 1946-S/D – $35
  • 1955 doubled die, obverse — $1,200
  • 1970-S small date – $30
  • 1972 doubled die – $300
  • 1983 doubled die – $250
  • 1984 doubled die – $200
  • 1992-D close “AM” – $500
  • 1995 doubled die – $25
  • 1999 wide “AM” – $500

Here is another handy chart:

If you collect wheat pennies, I'd love to hear which ones you have found!